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there in that video this morning. they have the capability to be held and used to produce rapid fire. i asked a question on month ago, what purpose does serve in civilians hands are on the street. i haven't received an answer yet but they did blurt the second amendment. 2nd amendment. it wasn't about the 2nd amendment. i defend the second amendment. and i want to see that upheld and regulated and it hasn't been. when that was written on most 300 years ago we didn't have the weapons we have today in the technology. they had muskets and cannons. i think it was 1934 when the ban was put on machine guns, the regulation. we haven't had a mass killing with a machine gun since. i feel these so-called assault weapons that have certain characteristics should fall in that category and be banned. >> thank you mr. heslin, thank you very much. at one point steinbeck had to write a small paragraph that said basically, people are asking what happened. this was after his wife joined him in seattle and when he says we get is not charlie and john. and somebody must have said tim hey where's charlie? yes disapp
to bases u.s. attacking their own personal try for their government? >> guest: you raised the third factor, with united states, the tribes now of the central government with a triangle of conflict that is the conflict said is often overlooked. would you include the central government than you know, it has its own relationship for some benefit and it is troubled earth these jurors south africa and asia you find this. if it is tolerant and open to give citizens the right they deserve to freedom or education but if it surprised -- suppresses but you have problems where you see the of brutalization and gadaffi with the triumphs saw the pattern exist and we looked at 40 case studies it is a global study of what is going on in the world. >> host: take pakistan and walked us through the different tribes. >> it is the essential piece of the study because waziristan is one of the most targeted places on earth. one of them most high and the tribal places an onerous never completely conquered it is part of pakistan but they maintain their own dependence with pride and tradition. the ordinary tribes
of the task" with co-author mark bowden. former commander of u.s. forces recounts the major turning point in his thirty-four year military career which ended in 2010. this is about an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much, thanks for coming out. wonderful opportunity, the gentleman sitting next to me is kind of a big deal. for anyone who is -- pays attention to american foreign policy and military affairs you know that ever since the attacks on this country on 9/11 the united states has had to evolve militarily and in the intelligence community to meet the challenge of this new enemy and more than anyone i can think of, general mcchrystal has been responsible for shaping the evolution and developing what i call the targeting engine which is what we adopted as the primary method of defending the country. thank you for being here, great to see you. >> thanks for two kind introduction. i thought of you as a nonfiction writer but you have gone into fiction now. >> you were the commander of special operations in iraq and afghanistan and there have been a rapid evolution. i am familiar from w
. >> host: so ambassador ahmed, do locals in afghanistan, different tribes, see the u.s. as attacking their personal tribe or see their own afghanistan government? >> guest: peter, you have now raised a very important question. you raised the third actor. so you have the united states, you have the tribes, and you now rates the idea of the central government as a third person. you have a triangle and that is the complexity that is often overlooked. the central government has its open relationship with its own periphery, and very often it's a troubled one. go to the middle east, not africa, central asia, and you'll find this pattern. if the central government is tolerant and open and inclusive and gives it citizens the rights they deserve, to freedom to education, health, job opportunities, there's no problem. if it suppresses and suppresses and prewitt brailizes its own population you have problem. whether it's iraq and saddam hussein or sirral and brutalization of the people you. see the same pat turn. gadhafi, the eastern tribes, the benghazi people. so the pattern exists throughout
people really do talk about -- they use that kind of exercise language that i use in the book, you know, you need mental calisthenics as well as physical ones to kind of keep your mind healthy, and that apparently can be helpful in dealing with alzheimer's and things like that, so there may well be a prescription of video games we may want to dole out to senior citizens. ok. good. all right. >> called everything bad is good for you, agree, disagree, the book is there for you to read and debate. and we ..ncoming out. [applause] >> are you going to stay around? >> stick around, we are going to sign. >> is that where i >> next on the tv, trevor aaronson says since 9/11 the fbi has built up a network of over 15,000 informant and muslim communities around the u.s. he argues these informants spearhead phony terror plots which are then exposed by the fbi with great fanfare to make it look like the was doing a good job of keeping us safe. mr. aaronson is joined by coadjutor mother jones magazine. this is in our 15. [applause] >> thank you so much for coming out. trevor and i spend a lot of time
of the fact that was used to talk about the king is the fact that he was preventing people from coming to the country and being able to migrate here kyl and then if we look at the statue of liberty to give me your tired in your poor what i don't want people to take away from this hearing is all of a sudden we forgot about the tide of the poor and the people that are striving for a better life, so those are probably my biggest concerns when we what that he the president we sat and we have economic problems and we are getting out of them like we always do we and we will always prospered because we are resilient. but the question becomes what about the moral ground that we would see if we just said we are going to get about 11 million people and we are only going to focus on skilled workers we are not going to take care of this house and equal protection do you worry about that? >> i do. the fifth thing is our country is in a mess. we have a brain drain but not for the first time in history. it's never happened before. america has been a land. it is happening right now. if we wait to fix
to see featured on booktv? send us an e-mail at booktv at c-span.org or tweet us at twitter.com/booktv. on c-span2, we bring you booktv. 48 hours of non-fiction authors and books. here are programs to look out for this weekend. at 5:00 p.m. eastern. ben argues that liberals bully their competition discouraging political debate. then at 2:00 a.m. michelle alexander crime policy from the '70s were enacted to push back gangs made during the civil rights movement. on sunday with recent policy debates on congress in immigration rebring you stories from immigrants who share their experiences on booktv. that's at 4:00 p.m. eastern. at 11:00 p.m. on sunday. melvin argues that the government is spending excessively on defense. making us less secure. watch these programs and more all weekend long on booktv. for a complete schedule, visit booktv.org. next on booktv, petered bergen and a panel of contributors discuss the book "talibanistan: negotiating the borders between terror, politics and religion" which expores the threat posed by extremist who operate in the border area between af
to be commander u.s. central command and general david rodriguez u.s. army to be nominated to be commander of the u.s. africa command. these two combatant commands centcom and africom are the centers of gravity for our military's operations to counter the threat of terrorism. oath nominees have served our country with distinction and i want to thank each of you for your decades of military service and your willingness to serve once again. i understand that general austin 's wife charlene and general rodriguez' wife jen air with us this morning and i want to a knowledge them and thank them for their sacrifices, their support to our nominees throughout the years which is so essential to the success of our nominees and as is the committee's tradition are nominees are invited to introduce any family members or friends who may be with them this morning with their opening remarks. if confirmed general austin will assume command of centcom during it critical transition. not for military operations in afghanistan. in the coming months afghan forces will assume the lead responsibility for providing
that. but in any event, it's the group using the one and half million cell phones but it's the group watching the south korean soap operas but it's the group that is becoming the information consumers of north korea who are desperate for more information or salivating, the chairman of google was visiting because they are thinking that the opportunities for their closed system internet. and then there's all the north koreans a sickly, the rest of north korea, most of north korea, where just puncturing the bubble of censure, of censorship that exist in north korea with what north korea really spends on defense, what it spends on its missile programs. i've always equated it to the lesson of development including the local aid budget upon the village schoolhouse door so villagers would know if the village elders were stealing the money. that was intended for the schoolhouse. i think we can through basic information in this age that more and more north koreans know about the human rights record. north korean database that's now a permanent growing database now, five, six years running bec
must end this uncertainty about this position. mr. president, it is time for us to end this debate. and that is what we will be voting on now. later on, there will be a vote on whether to confirm senator hagel. the vote now is whether to bring this debate to an end. i hope we will so we can get on to the nomination vote. i yield the floor. i think it's noon and time for a vote. the presiding officer: the senator's time has expired. the senator from oklahoma has 30 seconds remaining. the senator from oklahoma. mr. inhofe: let me say that we -- everything has been said, not everyone has said it. however, i would like to make sure that everyone understands that the actual statements that were made by the former senator hagel in terms of the relationship of our country with israel and iran prior to the time that he was nominated, because many of those statements were changed at that time. i encourage the no vote on cloture. the presiding officer: the time is expired. under the previous order, the clerk will report the motion to invoke cloture. the clerk: cloture motion, we the undersig
from writing "black hawk down "with the way thing were in the early '90s. can you give us an idea of the overall strategy and we'll get to specifics, maybe but also the tactics you have developed? >> not me. a group of people did. thanks. take a you back a little bit. at end of the vietnam war as america has done at the end of other wars want special operations unit that are created specially get gutted or they get disbanded entirely. there's a bias to do away with them inspect in the late 1980s when i joined the special forces they were in pathetic shape. they were barely a shad low what they had been at the hay day of the vietnam war. in 1980, the mission was launched to try to conduct a rescue mission in teheran to rescue the american citizens held hostage in the embassy. it failed not only painfully, but it failed for many reasons but one of which is the special operations capability we had people who were brave and strong and whatnot. they were not an integrated community capable of doing complex things indeed. it was a complex endeavor. it failed. from the ashes there was a
? you reminded us at the very beginning of his talk about george herbert walker bush been a prudent, careful, cautious political leader. and then he tells as that he had a vision for a new world oil. he was ready to risk an enormous amount because he saw the stakes and is so much bigger than saddam hussein. >> general house? didn't we expect saddam hussein hussein -- but were casualties? can you believe were ready to throw the dice. that ambassador napper misunderstanding the man for whom this library is respected? >> go ahead, sir. [laughter] >> can i interject if i may? >> we should let the kool-aid vendor defend himself. >> i just want to point out if only one of the three of us agrees on this panel, i'm still batting .333 enacted into the hall of fame. [laughter] >> i guess i'm at least partly persuaded by the argument. i do think notwithstanding president bush's reputation for person that he also did have a broader vision about the way he wanted the world to look after his administration. and i do think the iraqi use of the crisis for us to accomplish its objectives sort of vio
. howard, will you dot honors? [applause] >> u.s. senator, vice president of the united states, nobel peace prize recipient, as cor winner, best selling author, any one of these superlatives alone would be enough to suggest that our next speaker is a force with which to be reckoned, but when combined into one individual, it is evident that al gore is a force of nature. he is always been on the leading edge of promoting the internet as a tool for greater communication, of climate change as one of the greatest perils of our time, and in his latest book, "the future," of the key medical technological, and philosophical drivers checking our world. ever the big picture thinker, al gore explores how we may harness these epic change agents for the good. although his public professionalized had it not been without controversy, his record of accomplishments speak to the life lived on the precipice of passion, purpose, and possibility. on behalf of the savannah book festival, it is by great honor to introduce to all of you al gore. [applause] [cheers and applause] >> thank you very much, thank you. t
chrystal discusses his memoir, "my share of the task." in the book the former commander of u.s. forces in afghanistan recounts the major turning points in his 34-year military career which ended in 2010. this is about an hour. [applause] >> well, thank you very much. thanks for coming out. i think this is a wonderful opportunity. the gentleman sitting next to me is kind of a big deal. [laughter] for anyone who is, pays attention to american foreign policy and military affairs, you know that ever since the attacks on this country on 9/11 the united states has had to evolve militarily, in our intelligence community, in many ways to meet the challenge of this new enemy. and more than anyone that i can think of, general mcchrystal has been responsible for shaping that evolution and developing the what i call the targeting engine which is what we have, i think, adopted as our primary method of defending the country. so thank you for being here, general mcchrystal. the great to see you. >> thanks, mark. thanks for a too-kind introduction. i always thought of you as a nonfiction writer, but you're free to g
be very dangerous for us to let him think that that is acceptable behavior. so this may be changing north korea's tolerance for risk. and the fact kim jong-un may be under the assumption that we are becoming even more risk and tolerant -- and tolerant. that we will be risk averse and cost of first a look at our budgeting paper cutting back on our operational capacity, a special with sequestration threatening at the end of this month. kim jong-un may be reading this headline to the sequestration thinking, united states couldn't afford to operate. who knows what he thinks on these issues? that it's very, very dangerous to let him think that this is something that's going to be acceptable. of course, it's deeply dangerous to threatening and do not to act on it. so we have to be very serious when we make decisions as a government on what to do. i think we're also emboldening iran. iran's latest action on nuclear proliferation can partly be explained by the successful missile and nuclear launch from north korea. so these are feeding age of the. it's collaborative. and it is very dangerous. now
of soviet affairs argues that our current level of spending on defense is excessive and is making us less secure. this 45 minute program is next on booktv. >> thank you for that introduction, and thank you for the invitation to come out here to discuss the book. let me say a few things about why wrote the book in the first place. several years ago, the secretary of defense made it known before he announced that he was going to lead the administration that he was going back to the state of washington. he was someone i follow closely. he was nominated to be the cia director in 1991, and as an obama supporter, i was shocked to find out that he was going to be kept on as the secretary of defense. what he told people, i found, and it was a major reasoning for why i wanted to write this book, what he said is that we are moving towards a smaller military. one that will do fewer things than be able to go fewer places, which he thought was a terrible thing and he added that he didn't want to be a part of that kind of a system that is going to retrench. my feeling has always been that we need a sm
of spending on defense is excessive and is making us less secure. this 45 minute program is next on book tv. >> thank you for that introduction and for the invitation to come out here to discuss the book. let me say a few things on why i wrote the book in the first place. several years ago, bob gates the secretary of defense noted before he announced he was going to leave the administration that he was going to go back to the state of washington. this is someone i followed closely over the years. i testified against him in 1991 when he was nominated to be the cia director. and as an obama supporter of course i was shocked to find out who was crowned be kept on as obama secretary of defense but when he told people i found interesting and was the major reason i wanted to write this book and what he said was we are moving towards a smaller military that will do fewer things and be able to go fewer places which he felt was a terrible thing and he added i don't want to be a part of that kind of system that is going to retrench. my feeling has been we need a smaller military that will do fewer th
that is facing us, our children, and theirs, and our house republican majority stands ready for the president and his party to join us in actually tackling the big problems facing this country. but today i'd like to focus on what lies beyond the fiscal debate. and over the next two years, our house majority will pursue an agenda that is based on a shared vision of creating the conditions of health, happiness, and prosperity, for more americans and their families. and to restrain washington from interfering in those pursuits. we'll advance proposals aimed at producing results in areas like education, health health, innovation, and job growth. our solutions will be based on the conservative principles of self-reliance, faith in the individual, trust in family, and accountability in government. our goal is to ensure that every american has a fair shot to earn success and achieve their dreams. it's my hope that i can stand before you two years from now and report you that our side, as well as the president's, found within us the ability to set differences aside in order to provide relief to so ma
who are going to join us upstairs we'll do so after this. thank you very much. thank you. you can join us upstairs for -- [inaudible] see you in a few minutes afterwards. thank you. >> we'll have more live coverage tomorrow. john kerry will be at the university of virginia what he is calling a major foreign policy speech since becoming secretary of state. you can see live coverage at 11:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. and the council on foreign relations hosts assistant secretary of state frederick barton on conflict resolution. that will be on c-span in the afternoon at 1230 eastern. [inaudible] >> the communism of china basically is communism in name only these days and it preserved the power of the members of communist party but they basically threw most ideology aside when deng chow ping opened it up to become a capitalist haven. the come nifl in china, they talk at great length at party conferences about marxism and leninism. it is all about preserving the party's power economically as the country continues to grow because they threw aside most vestiges of communism a long time ago. in
and u.s. secretary of state governor bush appointed the secretary of state of florida from 2005 to 2007. she has taught at ford service institute as the co-chair of the u.s. the part of state mandatory seminar for the newly appointed ambassadors and in an interesting twist she spoke at stanford university where secretary rice is a very distinguished member of the faculty and former provost and the university of miami school of law. she was the u.s. ambassador to the republic of iceland during the administration of george h. w. bush and during the ronald reagan administration he served as the under secretary and assistant secretary at the u.s. department of commerce where he was responsible for trade, development, export, and international travel and tourism and he was appointed by the florida governor jeb bush and charlie crist to serve on the statewide board. both sue and chuck serve on the board of directors of the council of american ambassadors. she's a deval graduate of stanford while we can't claim him as an ally, he's a longtime member and past chairman of the board of the univer
appreciate the same be done for all of us. it's not an absence of commitment, to try close because pakistan remains firmly committed to fighting, combating extremism and manifestations because u.s. is not something we could walk away from. it's a clear and present danger to our society and way of life. and when you say what are the worries? one of the worries is that there may be security vacuums after the straw down because many of the timelines spoken of in terms of transitions and sectarian of a possible negotiated peace are all right now timelines and we look at them with hope and we have been strenuous in moving all of our resources, clinical, to not make an otherwise to the task of whatever negotiated settlement the united states and afghanistan are seeking in this moment of challenging transition. >> termer cubby, david word, and emily jake. >> ambassador, thank you for being here. two questions. one, hamid karzai and david cameron had a meeting to spend a six-month deadline on tax of the taliban. two ambition i pakistan was a political party functioning in society? and two, to think
what did you learn? you think it's so important for us to know. he turns a weakness in the strength. don't give an inch. turnaround. is that the politics of personal destruction. certainly a politics of personal one upmanship. there was a role for wit and trauma. final ," off the top of my head, he love to ski. he also at one point visited the soviet union and at the national review group that got together. most of them went and i think it was the winter of 75 or 76. they don't have the right to grant permission. i'm not going to ask communist permission for anything, even to visit their country. he told me, i once said that i would no more go to the soviet union on vacation then i would if hitler had permitted it and skied in the austrian alps to our world war ii. he said buckley took some exception to that. it is a rather specialized point of view. may have handicapped me a bit, but i stuck with the. [applause] >> books about the financial industry in crisis. starting in a p.m. eastern, the personal finance industry. at nine kate institute president john allison argues that govern
commander of u.s. forces in iraq general loy austin to lead the command which is responsible for operations of middle east and afghanistan. general austin was joined by u.s. command nominee general david rodriguez who is a top commander in afghanistan from 2007 to 2011. this hearing is chaired by carl levin of michigan. it is two hours. >> good morning everybody and welcome this morning that committee considers the nomination of two very distinguished officers to the two of the most active and challenging combatant commands. general lloyd austin united states army nominated to the commander u.s. central command, and general david rodriquez, u.s. army to be nominated to be commander of the u.s. africa command. fees' to combat and commands, centcom and africom are the centers of gravity for the military's operations to counter the threat of terrorism. both nominees have served the country with distinction, and i want to faint each of you for your decades of military service and a willingness to serve once again. i and stand general austin's life and rodriguez's life are with us this morning.
and what's really happening there. um, and then that will put us in a much percent place to actually try to tackle the long-term, more persistent threats and allow us to focus our resources on those. >> host: michael daniel is the cybersecurity coordinator for the white house. gautham nagesh is the editor of technology executive briefing. this is "the communicators" on c-span. >> coming up next, a discussion about nuclear weapons in the middle east and the decrease of u.s. influence in the region. then in about half an hour we're live with the closing session of the national governors' association's annual winter meeting as tv's dr. oz speaks to the group on government responsibility for the personal wellbeing of its citizens. and later the senate returns at 2 p.m. eastern following its weeklong presidents' day recess when new hampshire senator, kelly ayotte, delivers the annual reading of president george washington's 1796 of farewell address. >>> also today on the c pan networks, the bipartisan policy center's housing commission releases its recommendations for future federal policy. i
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24